2014 SXSW - “Halt And Catch Fire”

On March 15th, AMC brought their upcoming series “Halt And Catch Fire” to the annual South By Southwest festival in Austin, TX. Lee Pace was in attendance, along with Scoot McNairy, Kerry Bishe, Mackenzie Davis, Toby Huss, creator Christopher C. Rogers and Christopher Cantwell, and executive producer Jonathan Lisco. You can see photos from the event (including the panel) in the gallery. I’ve also added an interview with Lee and Mackenzie from SXSW to the press archive; check out an excerpt below:

CraveOnline: What are your roles in “Halt and Catch Fire” as they pertain to the PC industry?
 
Lee Pace: I’ll start about Joe MacMillan. Joe is someone who comes from IBM. There was this phrase that our advisor told me about, The Wild Ducks. The Wild Ducks are the ones who left IBM and tried to start something else. There were a lot of them. So that’s what Joe is. He’s someone who’s leaving the corporate structure because this technology is such an exciting, fun wave. 
 
He’s looking down the road and seeing the potential of this technology. In the pilot I have a line that sticks out. “Computers aren’t the thing. They’re the thing that gets us to the thing.” I just need to get people to build the computer that I want that I’m going to bring to the world. That’s why I get together with Gordon Clark and Cameron, so they can build my computer. So we’re making a computer. It’s really simple. 
 
We’re just trying to make an awesome computer because in the world of tech, you’re either the most awesome or you’re out of business. Either you’ve got something that people want to spend your dollars on because everyone’s trying to fight for the same dollars. 
 
So how do you get to be the guy who gets them? The show is very much about how now these phones in our pockets are such ubiquitous parts of our lives, and they’re great. They give us so much freedom and do the things that we need them to do but someone made that happen, lots of people working very hard together and fighting and collaborating to turn the mainframes into these.

SOURCE: CRAVEONLINE

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First “Halt And Catch Fire” Episode Stills

I’ve added the first four episode stills available for “Halt And Catch Fire” which feature Lee Pace. Presumably, these are all from the pilot episode, which will air June 1st on AMC. My apologies for the delay in getting these uploaded to the gallery. The images are all HQ, so hopefully you’ll find some enjoyment out of them.

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First “Halt And Catch Fire” Trailer

AMC has released the first trailer for their new series, “Halt And Catch Fire.” Our first look at the upcoming drama is only 30 seconds long, so it’s essentially just a tease of things to come, but there’s plenty of Lee Pace footage for those interested. Excited yet? “Halt And Catch Fire” premieres Sunday, June 1st at 10/9c on AMC. Check out an official synopsis below:

“Halt and Catch Fire” is set roughly one year after IBM all but corners the market with the release of its first major product: the IBM PC. In this fictional drama, a former IBM executive, Joe MacMillan plans to reverse engineer the flagship product of his former employer and forces his current company, Cardiff Electric, into the personal computer race. MacMillan enlists the help of Gordon Clark, a once great engineer who dreams of creating a revolutionary product while trying to manage his initially unsupportive wife Donna, and Cameron Howe, a volatile prodigy who puts her future in jeopardy to join MacMillan;s rogue PC project. “Halt and Catch Fire” thrives on the spirit of innovation and explores what it’s like to stand at the forefront of something world-changing and work towards it, no matter the risk.

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First ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Trailer

The first trailer for Marvel’s upcoming film, Guardians of the Galaxy, premiered tonight during “Jimmy Kimmel Live.” The 2:30-long trailer gives a pretty good indication of what the tone of the film will be, which is to say: a little (appropriately) tongue-in-cheek. It looks like it’ll be riddled with satire and action alike. Unfortunately, we don’t get a good look at Lee Pace’s Ronan The Accuser (although there may or may not be a quick shot of him), but the trailer is definitely worth checking out regardless. Guardians of the Galaxy hits U.S. theaters August 1st.

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NEW FRENCH LEE PACE INTERVIEW

dwarfracistpartykingthranduil:

So, I bought a french magazine some weeks ago and I quickly post an extract on Tumblr and I said I’ll try to post the remaining of this very long interview. So here it is!

Even if Google traduction did most of the work, I still spent a lot of my time today writing the interview and trying to correct google mistakes and to translate accurately, so please, DON’T REPOST just after me, just reblog thank you!  I’m doing it for all the awesome Lee Pace fan! ENJOY!!!!!! And please forgive me for the remaining mistakes and feel free to correct me by ask, I don’t mind.

(I have not finished translating it yet, I translated the beginning and some other parts)

Source: L’écran fantastique, December 2013, n°348

Fantasy lovers remember your wonderful performance in the film THE FALL  and the cult series PUSHING DAISIES … it like the most when you play in the fantastic city, as you again in THE HOBBIT ?

I do not know if you know, but Tarsem had made some Fall postproduction  in your country, in Paris … On the Fantasy, I ‘ve always loved this genre which gives “carte blanche” to the imagination. It has been three years since I participated in the filming and postproduction  of the Hobbit, and I must say it was a unique, truly extraordinary experience. Peter Jackson is one of the most exciting directors I’ve met. It can give you inspiration and make you excel. This is a bold extremely talented artist , constantly progressing and taking risks . And he knows how it should tell a story to successfully captivate people of all ages and all cultures around the world. I think we do not always realize the extraordinary achievement that is … As for me, I took a lot of pleasure to embody Thranduil , as it is a being who has many facets, and high intelligence. This is an elf with a very complex personality … It has a dark , sad nature … and it is very very very old ! (laughs) I learned a lot playing Thranduil , who is also the first character elf written by Tolkien.

Peter Jackson said that your performance in The Fall was engraved in his memory. He even said that with this film, you had always been his first choice and only choice to play Thranduil … Does that mean you did not have to audition for the role ?

No, no . Although this is extremely flattering and very nice from Peter , I still had to audition in New York. We read some scenes and talked about the character , especially with Philippa Boyens who knows everything of Tolkien’s work . I explained to him what were the specific details that I knew about this character . But what I missed this time, it was an overview of Thranduil and his motives. And that Philippa could describe me . We know that in the original novel , he never leaves his kingdom of Middle Earth to go west , to the Elven land of Valinor. He prefers to stay where it is and continue to enjoy his immortality in his huge palace - fortress.

Can you talk about the motivations of Thranduil and his goals for his people and for himself?

I must say that playing this role, I have come to agree with the opinions of Thranduil , for several reasons. If you remember the prologue of the first episode, there is a scene where you see me with the grandfather of Thorin , and where we exchange a glance as Smaug just attacked Erebor , and the dwarves would need the help of the elves to defend themselves against this huge dragon. However Thranduil goes his way with his soldiers, without intervening. To me, what that look means is “You dwarf , you played with fire. You have amassed a huge treasure, phenomenal wealth, and you attracted  trouble with such greed. And now what happens to you is your problem, not ours. You drew the dragon and you will all be roasted . I saw so many centuries I do know that I can do absolutely nothing to take you from there … I warned you that this would happen. But you did not hear me because you thought you were smarter than me. ” In that scene and others, we understand how the elves are totally different from other peoples of Middle-earth . By their immortality, they are the sentinels of history, archivists of the past. They mock small hazards of life , people who amass fortunes and lose by greed , those who complain about what they have or do not have … What interests them are timeless concepts . Elves are forces of nature , such as very old trees that have seen so many lives , so many wars , and are still there. They have the serenity of a lion that dominates all the animals of the savanna. Thranduil is like that, always leaving some distance between himself and other people . This is the reason why he did not intervene when Smaug attack Erebor . And of course, when he sees these thirteen dwarves go on his land, because they have the draft to wake up and tackle this fearsome dragon , he can not let them do : it must absolutely stop them! It makes sense to tell them , “Now that’s enough! You ‘ve done enough stupid things like that! “

Does he protect his people from the damage that the awakening of the dragon could cause ?

Yes, I think this is one reason why it is so. Although elves are immortal , they can die if they are seriously injured . Their long lives are extremely valuable , and Thranduil don’t imagine putting them at risk lightly. In any case, certainly not to give a future king what he wants … This is what I find interesting about this character. His wisdom dictates a very logical behavior. And yet , Thranduil is a warrior whose courage , strength and intelligence are legendary in Middle-earth. He survived the battle of the last alliance, where his father was killed. Acts of war of his family are numerous and glorious, and dating back to the dawn of time . He is a king elf whose aura and life are legendary. He understands how things go and how to act since ages, and he hopes to leave a impeccable legacy to his successors . He is sure of his strength and when it should not be used. And I think this way of restricting himself listening only his wisdom is fascinating.

What did Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens and Peter Jackson say to you about the King of the Elves to guide you in your interpretation?

One of the pleasures we had in shooting this film was an opportunity to continue to talk about these characters with the team for dinner. This allowed us to learn more about Tolkien’s vision , in parts of the lives of the protagonists that are not addressed in the book, but to better understand these characters. Philippa Boyens knows every detail of these stories and can answer any questions you may have. Talking with Peter also helps to know what he wanted to tell about your character, and it helps you to interpret him by passing feelings and interesting information. These exchanges have helped me to know what were the expressions, postures and approach that best suited Thranduil . His way to raise eyebrows too (Ps: I didn’t add this sentence, this is really Lee Pace who said that !!!! :D). Thus we know what Peter has in mind when he tells this story.



Have you been inspired by real politicians, leaders and kings when you started to work how to play Thranduil ?

Yes, I was . As well as other elves from major fantasy stories , as Oberon  or the fisher King keeper of the Holy Grail . But I do not lose sight of that Thranduil is not acting as a human king . It is very different from us , as are the spirits of the woods described in Norwegian folklore , which are mischievous beings who do not mind playing tricks on men. When I was in New Zealand , I went to hike for three days around a beautiful lake . The only camera I had was my iPhone. The first night I tried my laptop to take pictures, and I could not find it anywhere , even after seeing searched all my stuff from top to bottom : either in my backpack or in my tent. The next morning , tucking all my stuff , I tried again , to no avail. Same thing the next day and the day after. The third night , I woke up suddenly, because I felt a hard object in my back. It was my IPhone , which had been stuck in the folds of my sleeping bag all this time. And I felt that the elves had played me a trick because I was walking in a very old forest, with ancient trees , with beautiful forms. It was as if they wanted to say ” we live here, and we do not like to see you come up with your modern machinery to take pictures. So we’ll take it away , to get you better watch with your own eyes, and keep it in your own memory. ” That is malice that Thranduil can show !

 

We have seen that Thranduil knew to be a very tough leader in episode one … What other aspects of his personality will we discover in this sequel ? For example, what kinds of relationships Thranduil he has with his son Legolas and Tauriel , the new elf created by the writer of the film ?

As we know from the Lord of the Rings , Legolas will join the Fellowship of the Ring and will participate in the great struggle against the actions of the forces of evil. However, Thranduil chooses to barricade the fortress in order to protect his people. This means that there are great differences of opinion between father and son. And two completely opposing attitudes on how to manage his wealth and immortality. When you receive such a gift , what do you choose to do?  Do you protect the treasure or will you risk losing everything you stand for what you think is right? On this point, Thranduil and Legolas did not agree , but as elves , family love that unites them is deeper than humans, because they have had more time in their very long lives to understand how this feeling is essential. It’s the same for their understanding of death, good and evil. The elves are sentient beings, very intuitive. When I talk about sensitivity, it is not sentimentality : I mean that all their senses are extraordinarily sharp . Thranduil can feel the movement of each sheet rippling in the wind in the large forest of Mirkwood .

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krclara:

TheHobbitAwardsBook2013

For the Elvenking, Thranduil, played by Lee Pace, the costume designers collaborated on a series of long, sweeping gowns and cloaks that reflect his status as King of the Woodland Realm.  “We figured “The way the character is designed—he’s beautiful, he’s exquisite,” Pace says.  ”He’s ethereal, but also unforgiving and cold, which we figured out before I even shot a scene.  We would do the costume fittings and I would be like, ‘Yeah, he takes up a lot of space this guy.  He belongs on a throne.’”

One of the crowns Thranduil wears was modeled by Weta Workshop’s Daniel Falconer directly from references in the book to a crown of leaves, thorns and berries.  His strong, elegant metal sword was milled down from a solid block of metal.  “There was something puritanical about having this unsympathetic metal blade that suited Thranduil’s intractability and arrogance,” Falconer supplies.

Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly), Legolas (Orlando Bloom) and Thranduil (Lee Pace) required very specific character details.  Bloom was able to reinhabit Legolas’s long, blond wig from The Lord of the Rings films, which provided a visual touchstone for Thranduil’s hair.  ”Legolas has a soft, golden glow to his hair, whereas his father’s is much more steely blonde, adding to his stature as a King,” comments Department Head Hair Rick Findlater.  ”Of course, Thranduil’s hair is much longer than his son’s, clearly expressing the passage of time that he has been alive.  I have to say that wind machines and his wig were not a perfect match on set, but the result was awesome, to say the least.”

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Bckstg: ‘The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug’

In case you haven’t yet had enough behind the scenes looks at The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug, here’s another to check out. This one is over 11 minutes long, with a look at various points throughout the film: the spiders and Mirkwood, Laketown, and Smaug inside the Lonely Mountain. The part showing the Woodland Realm does focus a little on Lee Pace as Thranduil, particularly his relationships with Thorin and Tauriel. For those who like seeing production goodies – including a bunch of dwarves fighting invisible spiders – it’s worth a watch.

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kanimaki:

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug featurette on Thranduil’s makeup and hairstyle.

kanimaki:

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug featurette on Thranduil’s costume

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kkwings:

With Thranduil, we established a bit of his look in the beginning of the first film. He’s got a long, lean quality, which Lee Pace inherently has, being the statuesque, wonderful man he is. He’s got such a great presence and wears clothes wonderfully. Accentuating that long, lean quality was the primary objective, and also giving him a richness and a kingly darkness. He has these big, voluptuous, draping robes that hang off him to create that sense of opulence and grandeur befitting a king. He’s also thousands of years old, so there needs to be an aged tenor, an antique quality about these clothes to show that they have been around for a long time.
It’s great when you have fittings with the actor, but then when you see it with the hair and the makeup, it all becomes one. Thranduil’s hair is so iconic and wonderfully creative, it makes him even longer. When you put that together with his garment, it’s just amazing. It makes it all work.
THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG BOB BUCK (Costume Design) Q&A

kkwings:

With Thranduil, we established a bit of his look in the beginning of the first film. He’s got a long, lean quality, which Lee Pace inherently has, being the statuesque, wonderful man he is. He’s got such a great presence and wears clothes wonderfully. Accentuating that long, lean quality was the primary objective, and also giving him a richness and a kingly darkness. He has these big, voluptuous, draping robes that hang off him to create that sense of opulence and grandeur befitting a king. He’s also thousands of years old, so there needs to be an aged tenor, an antique quality about these clothes to show that they have been around for a long time.

It’s great when you have fittings with the actor, but then when you see it with the hair and the makeup, it all becomes one. Thranduil’s hair is so iconic and wonderfully creative, it makes him even longer. When you put that together with his garment, it’s just amazing. It makes it all work.

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG BOB BUCK (Costume Design) Q&A

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'The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug' For Your Consideration Videos

With award show season upon us (and the Oscars quickly approaching), movie studios are heavily promoting the best of their films. Among them is The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug, which Warner Brothers has submitted for award consideration. In fact, you can see a list of their hopeful nominees right here.

Several short “For Your Consideration” videos have been posted online, each including a certain segment up for an award. Lee Pace is featured in a few of them, either conducting an interview or in some new behind the scenes footage (with talk about his character from production designers).

I am unable to embed these videos for now, but you can watch them by clicking on a still image of each one. Above is the Directing video, promoting Peter Jackson; you can also find one for Costume Design and another for Makeup & Hairstyling below. It seems many people loved working on Lee as the striking Elvenking, Thranduil.

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Anonymous asked: Is your website off the air again ??

Indeed. Looks like a bunch of sites on my host were hacked. Will get it up ASAP!

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leepaceisawesome:

From FilmInk magazine December 2013 issue (source), don’t remember this being posted before…
The Hobbit is also featured in the January 2014 issue.

leepaceisawesome:

From FilmInk magazine December 2013 issue (source), don’t remember this being posted before…

The Hobbit is also featured in the January 2014 issue.

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'The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug' Production Video #14

True to his word, Peter Jackson & Co. have released the fourteenth production video for the Hobbit trilogy. This one focuses entirely on composing the film(s) and shows the orchestras working in the same location used for the first, Lord of the Rings trilogy. You won’t find behind the scenes, on set goodies in this one, but no worries: although this is the last production video of 2013, there will be more in the coming year.

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